Presented by David Roberts, Technical Manager – Well Engineering

Wednesday, June 3, 2020 | 3:00 PM GMT / 9:00 AM CDT

In this webinar, you will learn how typical approaches to well analysis are prone to over-conservatism, how the Combined Simulation (CSim) technique helps overcome this, how to increase confidence in well models, and how to avoid costly over-specification of well equipment without compromising safety.

REGISTER

Detailed Event Outline

Complex well modelling scenarios can exist for several reasons, but they usually come about because something is “non-standard” or “unusual”. The features that give rise to these situations can broadly be grouped into three categories: non-standard well components, non-standard loading conditions, and mechanical well failure/deterioration.

It can be extremely challenging to tackle “non-standard” well scenarios using standard software tools and methodologies. A common industry practice to address this is to make overly conservative assumptions, however, using this approach lacks analytical accuracy and leads to overly conservative solutions and significant associated costs.

The most effective way of ensuring a complex well is tackled properly, and cost-effectively, is to ensure the analysis models represent the situation as closely as possible. This increases confidence in the accuracy of the results and makes it easier to determine the correct course of action. This can often not be achieved with a single application, and a Combined Simulation (CSim) technique, which combines the strengths of multiple software packages in a holistic analytical approach, can be used to achieve greater accuracy.

In this webinar, we will describe the use of CSim to aid in equipment specification and operational decision-making. The application of the CSim approach to a complex electric submerged pump assembly, a conductor pipe tally-error during installation and loss of rigidity in a subsea wellhead will be described.

Learning Outcomes

  • How typical approaches to well analysis are prone to over-conservatism, are affected by software limitations and can neglect important sources of loading
  • How, by applying holistic engineering and the CSim approach, these limitations can be overcome
  • How confidence in well models can be improved
  • How costly over-specification of well equipment can be avoided without compromising safety

This webinar is ideally suited for tubular design engineers, drilling and completions engineers, asset integrity engineers/managers and those wanting to increase their knowledge in how to effectively address complex well scenarios.

About the Presenter

David has 24 years of engineering and fieldwork experience in well design and construction and has been with 2H Offshore for four years. His first decade in the oil industry was spent in field roles running wireline and downhole tools in numerous onshore and offshore basins worldwide. Subsequently, David has specialized in the mechanical analysis of casings and completions, both in operators and service companies and has experience in complex well types including extreme H2S/CO2, ERD, relief wells and complex abandonments. David holds a bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from Liverpool John Moore’s University.

Presented by David Roberts, Technical Manager – Well Engineering

Wednesday, June 3, 2020 | 3:00 PM GMT / 9:00 AM CDT

In this webinar, you will learn how typical approaches to well analysis are prone to over-conservatism, how the Combined Simulation (CSim) technique helps overcome this, how to increase confidence in well models, and how to avoid costly over-specification of well equipment without compromising safety.

REGISTER

Detailed Event Outline

Complex well modelling scenarios can exist for several reasons, but they usually come about because something is “non-standard” or “unusual”. The features that give rise to these situations can broadly be grouped into three categories: non-standard well components, non-standard loading conditions, and mechanical well failure/deterioration.

It can be extremely challenging to tackle “non-standard” well scenarios using standard software tools and methodologies. A common industry practice to address this is to make overly conservative assumptions, however, using this approach lacks analytical accuracy and leads to overly conservative solutions and significant associated costs.

The most effective way of ensuring a complex well is tackled properly, and cost-effectively, is to ensure the analysis models represent the situation as closely as possible. This increases confidence in the accuracy of the results and makes it easier to determine the correct course of action. This can often not be achieved with a single application, and a Combined Simulation (CSim) technique, which combines the strengths of multiple software packages in a holistic analytical approach, can be used to achieve greater accuracy.

In this webinar, we will describe the use of CSim to aid in equipment specification and operational decision-making. The application of the CSim approach to a complex electric submerged pump assembly, a conductor pipe tally-error during installation and loss of rigidity in a subsea wellhead will be described.

Learning Outcomes

  • How typical approaches to well analysis are prone to over-conservatism, are affected by software limitations and can neglect important sources of loading
  • How, by applying holistic engineering and the CSim approach, these limitations can be overcome
  • How confidence in well models can be improved
  • How costly over-specification of well equipment can be avoided without compromising safety

This webinar is ideally suited for tubular design engineers, drilling and completions engineers, asset integrity engineers/managers and those wanting to increase their knowledge in how to effectively address complex well scenarios.

About the Presenter

David has 24 years of engineering and fieldwork experience in well design and construction and has been with 2H Offshore for four years. His first decade in the oil industry was spent in field roles running wireline and downhole tools in numerous onshore and offshore basins worldwide. Subsequently, David has specialized in the mechanical analysis of casings and completions, both in operators and service companies and has experience in complex well types including extreme H2S/CO2, ERD, relief wells and complex abandonments. David holds a bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from Liverpool John Moore’s University.